Archivi categoria: Biomimicry

When biophilia meets biomimicry.

What does good look like? Join the International Living Future Institute in Paris at Biomim’expo next October, 23rd for a workshop on “Creating Biophilic Buildings for a Regenerative Future

October 23, 2018 – Paris, France
at Biomim’expo 2018, Cité des sciences et de l’industrie de La Villette
#S3 – LOTUS A3 – 14:30-16:00 – Creating Biophilic Buildings for a Regenerative Future, by the International Living Future Institute.

As part of our Living Building Challenge – workshop series, Living Future Europe, will deliver a series of workshops to enable participants to expand their regenerative design capabilities and integrate concepts into their practices such as Biophilic Design. The event includes the following workshop: “How to create truly biophilic and regenerative buildings and communities”. This workshop is aimed at architects, engineers, developers and product manufacturers interested in innovative and transformative solutions, providing insights from leaders in the green building community through real-world examples while providing tools and techniques that can be applied in the local French context.

Spaces are limited to 60 for this training opportunity. The workshop will be animated in English with possible interactions in French thanks to the translation of Estelle Cruz and Louise Hamot.

Dans le cadre de notre série d’ateliers sur le Living Building Challenge, Living Future Europe propose des ateliers pour permettre aux participants d’approfondir leurs compétences en conception régénérative et d’intégrer ces concepts dans leurs pratiques comme la conception biophilique. Cet événement correspond au workshop suivant: “Comment créer des bâtiments et communautés régénérateurs”. Cet atelier s’adresse aux architectes, ingénieurs, développeurs et fabricants de produits intéressés par des solutions innovatrices et transformatrices, offrant une réflexion menée par des leaders de la communauté de la construction écologique anglo-saxonne à travers des exemples concrets tout en fournissant des outils et techniques qui peuvent être appliqués dans le contexte français local.

Les places sont limitées à 60 personnes pour cette occasion. L’atelier sera animé en anglais avec des interactions possibles en français grâce aux traduction de Estelle Cruz et Louise Hamot.

Moderated by:

  • Carlo Battisti, European Executive Director INTERNATIONAL LIVING FUTURE INSTITUTE. Sustainable Innovation Consultant and Project Manager. Degree in Civil Engineering from the Politecnico of Milan, about twenty years of experience in construction companies, with different roles // Consultant en innovation durable et chef de projet, Carlo est Diplômé en Génie Civil à l’Ecole Polytechnique de Milan. Il a aujourd’hui une vingtaine d’années d’expérience dans des entreprises de construction en ayant occupé différents postes.
  • Louise Hamot, Engineer – Architect, Sustainability and Environmental Analysis, Elementa Consulting. While having just graduated from a double diploma in Architecture with high honors of the Jury at Ensa Nantes and in Engineering with a major in Urban and Building physics at Ecole Centrale, she has more than 2 years of professional experiences in deep green architecture // Ingénieur Architecte DE, diplômée de l’Ecole Centrale de Nantes en Physique de l’Environnement Urbain et du Bâti et de l’Ecole Nationale Supérieure d’Architecture de Nantes, Louise a plus de 2 ans d’expérience professionnelle en architecture regenerative.
  • Estelle Cruz, Architecte-ingénieur, Chargée de mission Habitat du Ceebios. A young state-certified architect and engineering student, Estelle followed the dual courses of architecture and engineering at ENSAL and Ecole Centrale de Lyon. Passionate about biomimicry, she undertook a one-year “biomimicry world tour” // Jeune Architecte diplômée d’Etat et élève ingénieur (en cours de validation d’acquis), Estelle a suivit le double cursus architecte-ingénieur de l’ENSAL et Ecole Centrale de Lyon. Passionnée par le biomimétisme, elle a entrepris durant un an un “tour du monde du biomimétisme”.

Biomim’expo 2018
23/10/2018 – 08:30 à 19:30
Cité des sciences et de l’industrie
30 Avenue Corentin Cariou
75019 Paris, France
http://www.biomimexpo.com

Participation is free, but places are limited. To attend the workshop you need first to register to Biomim’expo. The International Living Future Institute has still some free tickets available. Please contact carlo.battisti@living-future.org. Once you registered for Biomim’expo you can register for free to this workshop using this link selecting the box  #S3 – LOTUS A3 – 14h30 – Creating Biophilic Buildings for a Regenerative Future and writing you name, email address and first 4 numbers of your Biomim’expo entry ticket. We are looking forward to meeting you in Paris 🙂

Le letture estive del Collaborative.

Il Living Building Challenge Collaborative: Italy Vi augura una rilassante pausa di agosto tra mare, montagna, lago, città d’arte e viaggi più o meno lontani, proponendovi una lista di letture estive “must read” per inspirarvi nella ricerca di una sostenibilità rigenerativa. Buone Ferie ! (tra parentesi: chi vi suggerisce il libro 🙂

The Living Building Challenge Collaborative: Italy wishes you a relaxing break in August at seaside, mountain, lake, cities of art and journeys, more or less distant, proposing a list of “must read” summer readings to inspire you while searching for a regenerative sustainability . Have great vacations! (in brackets: who suggests the book 🙂

Powell Books, Portland (OR, USA)

Giuseppe Barbiero – Ecologia affettiva

Giuseppe Barbiero – Introduzione alla biofilia

Paolo Cognetti – Le otto montagne [Alessandro Speccher]

Elena Dal Pra – Haiku: Il fiore della poesia giapponese da Basho all’Ottocento [Michele Massaro]

Rudolf Finsterwalder – Form follows nature [Michele Massaro]

Marco Aurelio – Colloqui con se stesso [Marco Rossato]

Roberto Pagani, Giacomo Chiesa, Jean-Marc Tulliani – Biomimetica e Architettura. Come la natura domina la tecnologia [Michele Massaro]

Peter Wohlleben – Das geheime Leben der Bäume: Was sie fühlen, wie sie kommunizieren – die Entdeckung einer verborgenen Welt [Carlo Battisti]

Il Living Building Challenge Collaborative: Italy (LBCC Italy) è un gruppo di professionisti locali volontari impegnati per la sostenibilità, la formazione e l’attuazione del Living Building Challenge. Il LBCC Italy fornisce un forum unico di confronto “dal vivo” per facilitare il cambiamento nell’ambiente costruito. LBC è lo standard di sostenibilità più avanzato al mondo. Il numero di gruppi che sta cercando di realizzare in varie parti del mondo le condizioni del Living Building Challenge cresce ogni anno.

The Living Building Challenge Collaborative: Italy (LBCC Italy) is a group of local professional volunteers committed to sustainability, education and implementation of the Living Building Challenge. The LBCC Italy provides a unique in person forum to facilitate change in the built environment. LBC is the most progressive sustainability standard in the world.  The number of teams trying to achieve Living Building Challenge status increase every year.

Chiunque sia interessato a partecipare al LBC Collaborative: Italy, può contattarci o trovarci ai seguenti numeri | Anyone interested in getting involved in the LBCC Italy, please contact us or find us at

Living Building Challenge Collaborative: Italy
c/o International Living Future Institute
Voltastraße / Via Volta 13°
I-39100 Bozen / Bolzano
Tel. +39 0471 094989
LBCCItaly@gmail.com
Web:                    http://collaboratives.living-future.org/italy
Facebook:           https://www.facebook.com/LBCCollaborativeItaly
Twitter:               @LBCItaly
YouTube             LBC Collaborative Italy
SlideShare          http://www.slideshare.net/LBCCItaly

 

 

 

What does good look like?

Living Buildings in Europe, the autumn workshop series.

Thanks to you, the International Living Future Institute works every day to realise the climate action defined by the Paris Accords. We lead the direction toward products, buildings and communities that are socially just, culturally rich and ecologically restorative.

With this vision as our guide, we can enact truly transformational change.

Now, the Living Future Institute Europe is poised to unify a regenerative standard across a continent that is already leading the way to resilient built environments. We invite you to partner with LFI Europe to support this transformation and bring global solutions to a global problem.

Oct 17, 2018 Barcelona, Spain

We are excited to announce that this October, we are hosting a series of Living Building Challenge Workshops and events across the continent. Here, you will learn:

  • How to create truly biophilic and regenerative buildings and communities
  • How to become a Zero Energy leader
  • How to achieve a Net Positive Water demand
  • How to select Healthy Materials

Oct 19, 2018 Malaga, Spain

These workshops are aimed at architects, engineers, developers and product manufacturers interested in innovative and transformative solutions, providing insights from leaders in the green building community through real-world examples. Workshop participants will receive instruction on the actionable tools and techniques that can be applied in your local context.

Oct 23, 2018 Paris, France

REGISTER HERE FOR OUR UPCOMING EVENTS

Oct 24, 2018 Eindhoven, Netherlands

Spaces are limited for this unique training opportunity; please RSVP TODAY.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Reserve your seat.

For further information about these events and the Living Future Institute Europe initiative:

International Living Future Institute
Voltastraße / Via Volta 13A
I-39100 Bozen / Bolzano
Tel. +39 0471 094989
carlo.battisti@living-future.org
https://living-future.org/living-future-europe/

Matera. Benessere e felicità riscoprendo il proprio passato.

[Questo articolo, scritto in collaborazione con Giuseppe Larato, Michele Massaro e Michele Scavetta, è la versione estesa in italiano dell’articolo “Matera, Italy: the original Living Community“, pubblicato sull’ultimo numero di Trim Tab (vol. 33) dell’International Living Future Institute, che potete leggere qui].

Matera, da vergogna nazionale a patrimonio dell’umanità.

Matera rappresenta il paradigma dell’evoluzione di un insediamento umano riferibile essenzialmente a due elementi che nei Sassi[1] hanno un’evidenza particolare:

  • un assetto spaziale organizzato attorno a spazi comuni che determina pratiche collaborative tra gli abitanti nella gestione delle attività quotidiane;
  • una piena integrazione dell’insediamento umano nell’ambiente naturale, ottenuta sviluppando e perfezionando tecniche di costruzione finalizzate a utilizzare le caratteristiche orografiche per adattarsi al clima arido del sito. L’elemento che ha condizionato in modo determinate l’evoluzione urbana è la necessità di garantire l’approvvigionamento idrico attraverso la raccolta e l’accumulo dell’acqua sorgiva e piovana con un sistema capillare e diffuso di canalizzazioni e cisterne.

Gli studi, che hanno interessato Matera nell’immediato dopoguerra, hanno enfatizzato la vita comunitaria che caratterizzava l’assetto sociale dei Sassi considerando il “vicinato” come modello da conservare e trasferire nei nuovi insediamenti che si andavano realizzando.

La scarsa considerazione assegnata dagli studi alla “qualità” dell’insediamento urbano nelle sue componenti relative alla sostenibilità e alla resilienza può essere addebitata alle particolari condizione abitative che caratterizzavano i Sassi nell’immediato dopoguerra riconducibili:

  • ai fenomeni di sovraffollamento delle abitazioni determinatasi storicamente nel periodo tra le due guerre che aveva visto Matera passare dai 20.163 abitanti del censimento del 1931 ai 30.390 del Censimento del 1951;
  • alle evidenti criticità che il sovraffollamento aveva creato, squilibrando il rapporto tra risorse, unità abitative e popolazione.

La mancanza di salubrità delle abitazioni dei Sassi non è stata considerata una condizione contingente ma una “vergogna” da sanare con il trasferimento in abitazioni “moderne”, senza cogliere le possibilità, recuperando la sapienza costruttiva accumulata nel corso dei secoli dagli abitanti, di traghettare con continuità l’insediamento dei Sassi nella “modernità”.

Solo nel 1993, con l’iscrizione nella lista del Patrimonio Mondiale dell’umanità, viene riconosciuto ai Sassi, dopo 40 anni di abbandono il loro valore di:

  • “eccezionale testimonianza … per le generazioni future per il modo di utilizzare la qualità dell’ambiente naturale per l’uso delle risorse del sole, della roccia e dell’acqua” (Criterio 3)
  • “esempio rilevante di un insieme architettonico e paesaggistico testimone di momenti significativi della storia dell’umanità” che hanno portato alla realizzazione di “sofisticate strutture urbane costruite con i materiali di scavo” (Criterio 4)
  • “rilevante esempio di insediamento umano tradizionale … che ha, dalle sue origini, mantenuto un armonioso rapporto con il suo ambiente naturale e un equilibrio tra intervento umano ed ecosistema per oltre nove millenni” (Criterio 5)

Le leggi speciali che hanno accompagnato l’evoluzione di Matera e dei Sassi da “Vergogna nazionale” a “Patrimonio dell’Umanità” e recentemente a “Capitale europea della cultura 2019” hanno svolto un ruolo rilevante.

Dalle prime leggi che hanno previsto lo sfollamento dei Sassi, il trasferimento della popolazione nei nuovi quartieri e il conferimento al demanio statale delle abitazioni abbandonate, con la legge 771/1986 si è arrivati ad avviare un vasto intervento di recupero che ha visto come protagonisti il Comune e i privati, attraverso l’istituto della subconcessione onerosa[2], i cui risultati sono evidenti.

Le particolari suggestioni che oggi la città di Matera offre possono essere ricondotte alla sensazione di “coerenza” complessiva dell’insediamento che gli interventi di recupero sono riusciti a realizzare nei singoli elementi costruttivi. Questo fa sì che i Sassi di Matera possano rappresentare, in modo esemplare, i valori presenti in molte città bacino del mediterraneo.

Matera, la comunità biofilica e sana.

L’antica città di Matera è un modello insediativo caratterizzato da un rapporto stretto con la natura del luogo.  Una città mediterranea, un “rifugio” scavato nella roccia, che ha i principi basilari di una comunità sana e felice. L’ambiente, a misura d’uomo, è fatto di luoghi sani, biofilici ed è costituito da invisibili connessioni che consentono flessibilità, efficienza e libertà.

Da ogni punto della città antica, dal Sasso Barisano, alla Civita, al Sasso Caveoso, ci si rapporta strettamente alla gravina[3]. Tale solco torrentizio non è che l’immagine della preistoria, appartenenza ancestrale alla madre terra, MATER- Matera.

Le caratteristiche ambientali costruiscono la città in una molteplicità di stratificazioni. C’è il colore cangiante della roccia, il suono dell’acqua della gravina, colonna sonora del giorno; c’è il senso di grande respiro che sale verso il cielo lungo i pendii.  Il sole e le ombre si seguono fino in fondo alle grotte scavate in obliquo, magiche e misteriose meridiane.

Una moltitudine di giardini pensili, di piante di vite si arrampicano come ragni alle pareti scavate a coprire i patii a mezzogiorno. Il paesaggio geologico diventa materiale costruttivo e attore protagonista della vita quotidiana. Tra le macchie e lungo il torrente non è raro scorgere una volpe con la fulgida coda come un pennello a dipingere il sentiero.

Le forme naturali sono nei sentieri curvi, disegnati per gli asini, un fiorire di segni botanici. Tutto si avvolge in se stesso come i canali di raccolta dell’acqua che con vortici veloci e le fenditure nette si riposano in ampie e placide cisterne, immobili ed eterne. Tutto è biomimesi, tutto appare come natura umanizzata. I percorsi e gli ambienti interni sono variabili alle stagioni e al tempo; sistemi aperti e chiusi s’intrecciano tra loro in una successione tra pubblico e privato in cui tutto è interconnesso. C’è una gerarchia complessa, come arterie e capillari nel corpo degli esseri viventi.

La luce naturale, simbolo di vita e colore, ha costruito questi ambienti, indicando la linea di scavo delle grotte fino a illuminarne le profondità.

Matera è spazio dell’anima, connessa con la storia umana e con la cultura materiale. Il senso che pervade la città è la verità e l’autenticità. Si esprime un grande senso di empatia, di forte connessione d’animo. E’ un equilibrio perfetto tra l’antico e il moderno in cui l’essere umano può sentirsi parte integrante della natura, sicuro rifugio. Un complesso sistema di stratificazioni che non esprime mai disordine ma continuo senso di scoperta e sicurezza. La contiguità nel vicinato esprime affezione umana, confronto in uno scambio di umanità. Un modello di comunità di grande spiritualità e bellezza che come diceva Stendhal “… è una promessa di felicità”.

Matera, Living Community?

La città di Matera è un luogo unico dove non è più possibile distinguere l’ambiente naturale e il luogo antropizzato perché il primo ha invaso il secondo e viceversa, un luogo in cui grotte naturali diventano casa e grotte scavate diventano naturali in un continuo rapporto osmotico che perdura anche oggi. Le abitazioni conservano quelle caratteristiche che le hanno connaturate per millenni, in un efficace dialogo con la contemporaneità che contribuisce alla sua stessa tutela.

L’impossibilità di raggiungere tutte le abitazioni con mezzi a motore regala inaspettati silenzi e una qualità della vita all’aperto ineguagliabile, oltre che un ambiente salubre e sicuro, in cui la mobilità lenta allontana i rischi prodotti dagli autoveicoli.

Da un punto di vista energetico potremmo immaginare che l’intero rione Sassi sia un’immensa massa con grande inerzia termica, se questo impone apporti energetici durante il periodo invernale, annulla l’utilizzo di metodi di raffrescamento estivi che sono preponderanti a queste latitudini.

L’essere Patrimonio Mondiale UNESCO, insieme con enormi vantaggi legati alla visibilità e al valore intrinseco del riconoscimento, impone degli obblighi, obblighi di rispetto del patrimonio stesso e del suo valore. Ne segue la necessità di utilizzare unicamente materiali della tradizione, privi quindi di agenti inquinanti. Pietra (tufo), legno, vetro e ferro li ritroviamo nelle facciate, nelle porte di accesso alle grotte, nelle piccole finestre e nelle ringhiere che disegnano il prospetto dei sassi, perché i Sassi questo sembrano, un unico indistinguibile prospetto nel quale colori e materiali in una danza silenziosa si uniscono agli spuntoni di roccia e all’azzurro del cielo per donarci immagini meravigliose.

Alicia Daniels Uhlig (International Living Future Institute)

Living Buildings e Living Communities: la sfida della rigenerazione, Matera, 6 febbraio 2018

L’evento organizzato dal Living Building Challenge Collaborative: Italy, ha portato il protocollo e la filosofia LBC nel cuore dell’estremo sud d’Italia. All’interno di Casa Cava – un’ex cava di tufo nei Sassi di Matera adibita a spazio per eventi culturali – si sono riuniti più di 120 architetti e ingegneri dalla Puglia e dalla Basilicata.

Alicia Daniels Uhlig, in collegamento da Seattle, ha illustrato il protocollo Living Community Challenge, con alcuni paralleli interessanti con l’esperienza di Matera. Nell’introduzione all’evento Michele Massaro, del Collaborative Italy, ha sottolineato come le buone pratiche di sviluppo urbano di Matera, siano un esempio ancora molto attuale di sostenibilità dell’ambiente costruito. Giuseppe Larato, pure del Collaborative, ha poi sintetizzato i più diffusi protocolli sulla sostenibilità degli edifici, aprendo la strada a una riflessione su LBC. Dal Politecnico di Bari, Francesco Fiorito ha evidenziato l’importanza di ridurre l’effetto isola di calore all’interno dei centri urbani; mentre Fabio Fatiguso ha analizzato i Sassi come caso studio di resilienza urbana per contrastare gli effetti del cambiamento climatico. Carlo Battisti, facilitatore del Collaborative italiano, ha infine fornito una panoramica sul protocollo LBC e sulla missione dell’International Living Future Institute.

I principi di LBC si ritrovano anche nelle attività di RESTORE (REthinking Sustainability TOwards a Regenerative Economy), un progetto di 4 anni finanziato dall’Unione Europea, che mira a creare le condizioni per una sostenibilità ristorativa dell’ambiente costruito, grazie ad una rete di più di 140 professionisti e ricercatori da 38 nazioni europee e internazionali.

Qui di seguito le presentazioni dell’evento:

[1] Con il nome “Sassi” a Matera s’intendono due grandi quartieri che costituiscono, insieme alla “Civita” e al “Piano”, il centro storico della città di Matera.

[2] Il concessionario di un bene demaniale può dare in uso a terzi, a titolo oneroso e dietro corrispettivo, locali facenti parte del demanio, sia mediante locazione che mediante subconcessione.

[3] La gravina è una tipica morfologia carsica della Murgia. Le gravine sono incisioni erosive profonde anche più di 100 metri, molto simili ai Canyon, scavate dalle acque meteoriche nella roccia calcarea. Le loro pareti, molto inclinate e in alcuni casi verticali, possono distare tra loro da poche decine a più di 200 metri.

This article, written in collaboration with Giuseppe Larato, Michele Massaro and Michele Scavetta, is the extended version of ‘Matera, Italy: the original Living Community’, featured on the last number of Trim Tab (Issue 33) of the International Living Future Institute, that you may read here.

Quel treno per Lancaster.

La prima scuola di formazione di RESTORE.

È passata già una decina di giorni dal ritorno da Lancaster, e sono ancora un po’ stordito. Mi aiuta a fare chiarezza lo scrivere cinque concetti principali che mi sono portato a casa. In inglese li chiamano “takeaway”, proprio come il “cibo da asporto”, avete presente il cartoccio di “fish and chips”? Anche se non è proprio così. Ti sembra di portarti via delle cose dal luogo dove hai vissuto un’esperienza intensa; ma in realtà molto di quell’esperienza rimane in quel luogo, ti tocca tornarci per riconoscerlo. Credo che tornerò a Lancaster, sì.

1. Il dono della sintesi

Ora è più che mai necessario. Avevo scritto il precedente post sulla “Restorative week”, che ci apprestavamo a vivere, ma mi sbagliavo, per difetto. Lancaster è sì stata anche la settimana “restorative”, l’immersione totale in ciò che RESTORE si appresta a diventare, una nuova concezione dell’ambiente costruito e degli edifici del futuro (come i living building di Living Future). Ma è stato molto di più. La training school di Lancaster segna un punto di non ritorno o meglio il “turning point”, il punto di svolta. Nulla davvero potrà essere come prima, l’arca di RESTORE (con i suoi 120+ partecipanti da 37 nazioni …) è salpata definitivamente.

Una mole di concetti, idee, spunti, prospettive, che raccontano un nuovo quadro di riferimento, un nuovo “framework”. Non ci siamo fatti mancare proprio nulla: restorative e regenerative sustainability, sustainability education, biophilia e biophilic design, sustainable heritage, mindfulness for sustainability, landscaping for regenerative sustainability. Ora ci attende un compito delicato e necessario, riuscire a realizzare una sintesi e a trasferire questo tesoro di conoscenza ai gruppi di lavoro che stanno arrivando e che dovranno tradurlo in linee guida, processi, metodologie, strumenti.

2. Il viaggio conta più della meta

Brockholes Nature Reserve, Preston (UK)

Il programma a ritmo serrato di questa settimana mi ha fatto perdere spesso di vista un concetto. Non è la meta, è il viaggio che conta. Siamo passati da un workshop a una lezione, a una presentazione, a una lecture, il tempo è volato, con il rischio di perdere il valore del sapere acquisito. Ma c’è il momento dell’apprendimento, c’è il momento della discussione, poi arriva il momento in cui devi spegnere tutto e fare sedimentare ciò che hai assorbito. Come in quel cammino circolare di venerdì mattina attraverso le paludi di Brockholes. Non siamo entrati subito nel centro visitatori, abbiamo fatto un giro lungo, apparentemente senza meta, e abbiamo preso il tempo, per ricollegarci con la natura e con noi stessi. È in quei momenti, di sospensione, che ciò che hai imparato diventa davvero patrimonio personale.

3. Le idee non sono nulla senza le persone

Sono convinto che “C’è una cosa più forte di tutti gli eserciti del mondo, e questa è un’idea il cui momento è ormai giunto” (Victor Hugo) e ciò mi porta a dire che per l’idea che è alla base di RESTORE i tempi sono maturi. Se ne avevamo bisogno, la comunità di “like minded people” (una quarantina di persone è già una comunità) che si è riunita a Lancaster – la stragrande maggioranza senza essersi mai vista prima – è la prova che questa idea è già forte, c’è e risiede già nella testa di quei molti professionisti pronti a (cambiare) salvare il mondo.

Ma le idee esistono perché esistono le persone. E presto scompare ogni differenza tra docente e alunno, e tutto diventa un continuo workshop collettivo, di nuovo un viaggio insieme. Grazie Martin per lo sforzo enorme e generoso e grazie a Edeltraud, Dorin, Emanuele e a tutto il “team Lancashire”: Ann Vanner, Alison Watson, Joe Clancy, Jenni Barrett, Paul Clarke, Simon Thorpe, Ann Parker, Barbara Jones e naturalmente Elizabeth Calabrese e Amanda Sturgeon. È stato soprattutto un “dare”, gratuito, nel senso nobile del termine. E grazie ai trenta “agenti del cambiamento” , queste “best minds” da Croazia, Danimarca, Germania, Ungheria, Irlanda, Italia, Lituania, Macedonia, Portogallo, Regno Unito, Romania, Slovenia, Spagna. Sono loro i “restorer” del futuro prossimo. “Credici. E sei già a metà strada.

4. Prima la filosofia, poi la tecnica.

La prima training school di RESTORE aveva l’obiettivo di trasferire ad un primo gruppo di professionisti un nuovo paradigma della sostenibilità, sviluppato nel primo “pacchetto di lavoro” del progetto. L’approccio è stato quindi volutamente più sistemico che tecnico e tecnologico. “Moving beyond the state of the art: where do we want to be?” recita una delle domande introduttive al corso. Per questo è importante prima capire cosa vogliamo essere, dove vogliamo andare (parlo soprattutto del nuovo futuro dell’ambiente costruito che ci immaginiamo). Poi arriva il momento della tecnica e della tecnologia, dei metodi, delle pratiche. Le soluzioni ci sono, già oggi, dobbiamo renderle funzionali ad una visione.

5. Il genius loci

We shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us.” diceva Winston Churchill. C’è un percorso logico evolutivo che ci ha accompagnato dal primo all’ultimo giorno di questa settimana densa di ispirazione. Abbiamo vissuto, studiato, lavorato, mangiato e dormito in edifici, ci siamo mossi da un edificio all’altro. E questi edifici hanno “formato” il nostro modo di viverli. Ci ripenso, è stato un lungo elenco – lo Storey, (costruito per essere un luogo per l’istruzione scolastica nel 1898, ora è un centro per l’industria creativa); la Toll House Inn (splendida taverna dell’800), il castello di Lancaster (del 1100, è stato una prigione fino al 2011), il ristorante Water Whitch, i numerosi pub, ecc.. Poi, venerdì, come al termine di un’iniziazione, siamo usciti all’aperto (Brockholes e Cuerden Valley Park)  per riconnetterci con la natura. Abbiamo dovuto guadagnarcelo, questo incontro finale con l’ambiente che ci circonda. Sì, così ha un senso.

Cuerden Valley Park, Preston (UK)

RESTORE web site

La 1a RESTORE training school

Lo storytelling della training school a Lancaster

RESTORE su Facebook

RESTORE su Twitter

RESTORE su SlideShare

The RESTORE web site is online.

The RESTORE web site is on line 😊

We are happy to announce that the RESTORE website is now up and running. You can visit it at http://www.eurestore.eu

The RESTORE Action aims at a paradigm shift towards restorative sustainability for new and existing buildings, promoting forward thinking and multidisciplinary knowledge, leading to solutions that celebrate the richness of design creativity while enhancing users’ experience, health and wellbeing inside and outside buildings, in harmony with urban ecosystems, reconnecting users to nature.

The RESTORE website is designed to provide you the most important information about RESTORE COST Action. You will be able to find all necessary details about the people involved, their work, the work and outputs from the Working Groups, but also about Short Training Scientific Mission funding opportunities and Training Schools.

Many sections of the website are still under development, but our goal is to make these web pages your hub for RESTORE information. We plan to communicate and disseminate the outcomes of the Action, but we also want to provide you with the information about the activities and involvement of our members. If you are organising any kind of event that might be of interest of other RESTORE participants, please contact us. We will happily share the information.

A reminder that applications for our First Training School are now invited. Please spread the word and be sure to apply if you are at all interested in Restorative Sustainability. Click here for more information.

Our goal is to make this page your hub for RESTORE information. We plan to communicate and disseminate the outcomes of the Action, but we also want to provide you with the information about the activities and involvement of our members. If you are organising any kind of event that might be of interest of other RESTORE participants, please contact us. We will happily share the information.

We look forward to seeing you engage with other RESTORE participants through the important and vibrant discussions and information sharing on our Twitter account and Facebook pages.

The website is based upon work from COST Action CA16114 RESTORE, supported by COST Programme (European Cooperation in Science and Technology).

Copyright © 2017 COST Action CA16114 RESTORE, All rights reserved.

  

 

 

 

RESTORE | REthinking Sustainability TOwards a Regenerative Economy

logo_costApproved by the COST Committee of Senior Officials on 24 October 2016, REthinking Sustainability TOwards a Regenerative Economy (RESTORE) is one out of the 25 new Actions that were selected out of 478 eligible proposals collected earlier in April.

RESTORE: ‘to return something or someone to an earlier good condition or position’.

Sustainable buildings and facilities are critical to a future that is socially just, ecologically restorative, culturally rich and economically viable within the climate change context.

Despite over a decade of strategies and programmes, progress on built environment sustainability fails to address these key issues. Consequently the built environment sector no longer has the luxury of being incrementally less bad, but, with urgency, needs to adopt net-positive, restorative sustainability thinking to incrementally do ‘more good’.

2017_02_01-01-restore

Within the built environment sustainability agenda a shift is occurring, from a narrow focus on building energy performance, mitigation strategies, and minimisation of environmental impacts to a broader framework that enriches places, people, ecology, culture, and climate at the core of the design task, with particular emphasis on the benefits towards health. 

Sustainability in buildings, as understood today, is an inadequate measure for current and future architectural design, for it aims no higher than trying to make buildings ‘less bad’. Building on current European Standards restorative sustainability approaches will raise aspirations and deliver restorative outcomes. 

Walden Pond, Concord (MA, USA)

Walden Pond, Concord (MA, USA)

The RESTORE Action will affect a paradigm shift towards restorative sustainability for new and existing buildings, promoting forward thinking and multidisciplinary knowledge, leading to solutions that celebrate the richness of design creativity while enhancing users’ experience, health and wellbeing inside and outside buildings, in harmony with urban ecosystems, reconnecting users to nature. 

The COST proposal will advocate, mentor and influence for a restorative built environment sustainability through work groups, training schools (including learning design competitions) and Short Term Scientific Missions (STSMs).

General information:

CA COST Action CA16114 REthinking Sustainability TOwards a Regenerative Economy
Start of Action: 09.03.2017  End of Action: 08.03.2021
Proposers: Carlo Battisti w/ Martin Brown, Sue Clark, Emanuele Naboni
Science Officer: Estelle Emeriau
Administrative Officer: Aranzazu Sanchez

For further information: carlo.battisti@eurac.edu

COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) is the longest-running European framework supporting trans-national cooperation among researchers, engineers and scholars across Europe. It is a unique means for them to jointly develop their own ideas and new initiatives across all fields in science and technology, including social sciences and humanities, through pan-European networking of nationally funded research activities. Based on a European intergovernmental framework for cooperation in science and technology, COST has been contributing – since its creation in 1971 – to closing the gap between science, policy makers and society throughout Europe and beyond.