Archivi tag: International Living Future Institute

What does good look like?

Living Buildings in Europe, the autumn workshop series.

Thanks to you, the International Living Future Institute works every day to realise the climate action defined by the Paris Accords. We lead the direction toward products, buildings and communities that are socially just, culturally rich and ecologically restorative.

With this vision as our guide, we can enact truly transformational change.

Now, the Living Future Institute Europe is poised to unify a regenerative standard across a continent that is already leading the way to resilient built environments. We invite you to partner with LFI Europe to support this transformation and bring global solutions to a global problem.

Oct 17, 2018 Barcelona, Spain

We are excited to announce that this October, we are hosting a series of Living Building Challenge Workshops and events across the continent. Here, you will learn:

  • How to create truly biophilic and regenerative buildings and communities
  • How to become a Zero Energy leader
  • How to achieve a Net Positive Water demand
  • How to select Healthy Materials

Oct 19, 2018 Malaga, Spain

These workshops are aimed at architects, engineers, developers and product manufacturers interested in innovative and transformative solutions, providing insights from leaders in the green building community through real-world examples. Workshop participants will receive instruction on the actionable tools and techniques that can be applied in your local context.

Oct 23, 2018 Paris, France

REGISTER HERE FOR OUR UPCOMING EVENTS

Oct 24, 2018 Eindhoven, Netherlands

Spaces are limited for this unique training opportunity; please RSVP TODAY.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Reserve your seat.

For further information about these events and the Living Future Institute Europe initiative:

International Living Future Institute
Voltastraße / Via Volta 13A
I-39100 Bozen / Bolzano
Tel. +39 0471 094989
carlo.battisti@living-future.org
https://living-future.org/living-future-europe/

Regenerative Design in the Digital Practice.

Apply for the 2nd RESTORE Training School 🙂

Supported by  the Institute of Architecture and Technology (IBT) of The Royal Danish Academy (KADK) and COST RESTORE Action CA16114.

Are you a European professional or a researcher with demonstrated experience in Regenerative Design? Or have you been applying Grasshopper based modelling of Outdoor Climate,  LCA-Circular Economy, or Indoor Wellbeing? Do you have experience in Grasshopper based integrated design? If the answer is yes to any of this question, and you would like to exchange and further develop your research and practical skills in an intensive design competition, this Training School in Malaga (15th to 19th of October, 2019) is for you. By the way, you will be co-funded with 800 euros to participate in 5 days of pure design and modelling,  digital tutorials from the international trainers and scientific conferences.

Click here for details and apply by August 5th, 2018.

The International Trainers

Emanuele Naboni (KADK), Chris Mackey (Ladybug Tools and Payette, USA),  Amanda Sturgeon (International Living Future Institute, USA), Negendhal Kristoffer (BIG, Denmark), Angela Loder (International WELL Building Institute, USA), Martin Brown(Fairsnape, UK), Ata Chokhachian (TU Munich, Germany), Daniele Santucci (TU Munich, Germany), Munch-Peterson Palle (Henning Larsen and KADK, Denmark), Alexander Hollberg (ETH Zürich, Switzerland), Panu Pasanen (One Click LCA, Finland), Wilmer Pasut (Eurac Research, Italy).

Regenerative Design: from Theory to the Digital Practice.

The aim of the conferences and the training school is the digital implementation of Regenerative Sustainable Design principles in the transformation of existing sites. Via the use of freeware digital parametric modelling, the challenges are to improve outdoor microclimate qualities and the indoor wellbeing, operating a transformation that responds to the criteria of Circular Economy.

The research and design project will represent, in this regard, an opportunity for enhancing life in all its manifestations. This presumes shifting the focus from a solely based human-centred design process into a nature-centred one, where “people and buildings can commit to a healthy relationship with the environment where they are placed”. Such approaches are discussed in morning conferences and in the afternoon scientific driven design developments.

The Barrio of La Luz, which was built after 1960 in Malaga is used as a reference. The site is a polluted heat-island, disconnected from sea breezes, with a spread hardscape, and with no presence of natural elements. Furthermore, the urban dwellers experience poor wellbeing due to the deprived quality of the units, being these modified by tenants often leading to obstructing natural ventilation and light. The projection of climate change will further exacerbate such outdoor and indoor conditions, and there is a need for an example of interventions that are scalable to the Spanish national level.

20 trainees will form four groups that will develop four competing transformation design proposals. The design that shows a qualitative creative solution with the higher simulated performances will be awarded. Criteria for evaluation will also include the quality of the digital modelling phases and the dynamics of development of the integrated strategies. To assess the projects’ success, the jury is composed of a mix of international and local professionals and scientist, with experience in architecture, performance and modelling.

Collaborating for a Living Future.

A brand-new steering committee for the Italian LBC Collaborative.

The Living Building Challenge Collaborative: Italy (LBCCI) is a group of local professional volunteers committed to sustainability, education and implementation of the Living Building Challenge. The LBCC Italy provides a unique in person forum to facilitate change in the built environment. LBC is the most progressive sustainability standard in the world.  While there are a handful of Living Buildings in the world, the number of teams trying to achieve Living Building Challenge status increase every year.

At the Living Building Challenge Collaborative: Italy meeting last May 23rd, we established the new Collaborative steering committee. The mission is to implement the Collaborative strategy and organize and develop the related tasks. The new committee has a clear competence related focus, to address effectively the challenge of developing LBC at a national scale, in close connection with the Living Future Institute Europe initiative and ILFI in Seattle.

Here are the new board members and their brief profiles: Carlo Battisti (facilitator, Outreach), Giuseppe Barbiero (Research), Alla Kudryashova (Operations), Michele Massaro (Projects), Marco Rossato (Products) and Alessandro Speccher (Education).

Carlo Battisti
Living Future Institute Europe
Sustainable innovation manager and consultant. Degree in Civil Engineering from the Politecnico of Milan, twenty years of experience with construction companies. Living Future Accredited Professional. In 2015, he co-founded the Living Building Challenge Collaborative: Italy.

Giuseppe Barbiero
University of Valle d’Aosta
Assistant professor in Ecology and Head of LEAF, the Laboratory of Affective Ecology at the University of Valle d’Aosta. He is co-editor of Visions for Sustainability. His main research interests are the biophilia hypothesis, and the biophilic design.

Alla Kudryashova
University of Bologna
B.A. in Management, M.Sc. in Strategic Leadership towards Sustainability. In 2015, discovered LBC while writing her thesis paper focused on assessment of BREEAM, LEED and LBC from a Strategic Sustainable Development Perspective. Currently serves Knowledge Transfer Office at the University of Bologna.

Michele Massaro
Freelance architect
Architect, strategic planner and innovation enthusiast, he works in the public and private sectors focusing architectural research according to systemic, biomimetic and territorial environmental characterization approaches. Beekeeper, he studies bees, inspiration of sustainability and beauty.

Marco Rossato
Faresin Formwork
Export Area Manager at Faresin Formwork SpA (Vicenza, Veneto region). He is an Architect and an Engineer interested in Sustainability, Design Process and R&D for Building products. He took part as contestant at ReGeneration 2017 LBC design competition.

Alessandro Speccher
Green Building Council Italia
A national recognized practitioner, lecturer, and leading authority in sustainability and regenerative design and implementation. He’s working with GBC Italia from 2007 as President’s assistant, Developer and Education manager and with Progetto CMR as green building and sustainability specialist.

The Living Building Challenge Collaborative: Italy headquarter is at NOI Techpark, Bolzano, same office as the local International Living Future Institute branch.

Anyone interested in getting involved in the LBCC Italy, please contact us or find us at:

Living Building Challenge Collaborative: Italy
c/o International Living Future Institute
Voltastraße / Via Volta 13A
I-39100 Bozen / Bolzano
Tel. +39 0471 094989
LBCCItaly@gmail.com

Web:                    http://collaboratives.living-future.org/italy
Facebook:           https://www.facebook.com/LBCCollaborativeItaly
Twitter:               @LBCItaly
YouTube             LBC Collaborative Italy
SlideShare          http://www.slideshare.net/LBCCItaly

NOI Techpark, Bolzano

Collaborando per un Living Future.

Comitato di gestione nuovo di zecca per il Collaborative italiano di Living Building Challenge.

Il Living Building Challenge Collaborative: Italy (LBCC Italy) è un gruppo di professionisti locali volontari impegnati per la sostenibilità, la formazione e l’attuazione del Living Building Challenge. Il LBCC Italy fornisce un forum unico di confronto “dal vivo” per facilitare il cambiamento nell’ambiente costruito. LBC è lo standard di sostenibilità più avanzato al mondo. Mentre al momento ci sono pochi edifici certificati LBC, il numero di gruppi che sta cercando di realizzare in varie parti del mondo le condizioni del Living Building Challenge cresce ogni anno.

Nella riunione del Collaborative dello scorso 23 maggio, abbiamo istituito il nuovo comitato di gestione del Collaborative. La missione è mettere in atto la strategia del Collaborative e organizzare e sviluppare le attività correlate. Il nuovo comitato ha un chiaro focus di competenza, al fine di affrontare efficacemente la sfida di sviluppare LBC su scala nazionale, in stretta connessione con l’iniziativa Living Future Institute Europe e ILFI a Seattle.

Ecco i nuovi membri del consiglio e i loro brevi profili: Carlo Battisti (facilitatore, diffusione), Giuseppe Barbiero (ricerca), Alla Kudryashova (attività), Michele Massaro (progetti), Marco Rossato (prodotti) e Alessandro Speccher (formazione).

Il Living Building Challenge Collaborative: Italy si trova presso il NOI Techpark a Bolzano, nello stesso ufficio italiano dell’International Living Future Institute.

Chiunque sia interessato a partecipare al LBC Collaborative: Italy, può contattarci o trovarci ai seguenti numeri:

Living Building Challenge Collaborative: Italy
c/o International Living Future Institute
Voltastraße / Via Volta 13A
I-39100 Bozen / Bolzano
Tel. +39 0471 094989
LBCCItaly@gmail.com

Web:                    http://collaboratives.living-future.org/italy
Facebook:           https://www.facebook.com/LBCCollaborativeItaly
Twitter:               @LBCItaly
YouTube             LBC Collaborative Italy
SlideShare          http://www.slideshare.net/LBCCItaly

Matera. Benessere e felicità riscoprendo il proprio passato.

[Questo articolo, scritto in collaborazione con Giuseppe Larato, Michele Massaro e Michele Scavetta, è la versione estesa in italiano dell’articolo “Matera, Italy: the original Living Community“, pubblicato sull’ultimo numero di Trim Tab (vol. 33) dell’International Living Future Institute, che potete leggere qui].

Matera, da vergogna nazionale a patrimonio dell’umanità.

Matera rappresenta il paradigma dell’evoluzione di un insediamento umano riferibile essenzialmente a due elementi che nei Sassi[1] hanno un’evidenza particolare:

  • un assetto spaziale organizzato attorno a spazi comuni che determina pratiche collaborative tra gli abitanti nella gestione delle attività quotidiane;
  • una piena integrazione dell’insediamento umano nell’ambiente naturale, ottenuta sviluppando e perfezionando tecniche di costruzione finalizzate a utilizzare le caratteristiche orografiche per adattarsi al clima arido del sito. L’elemento che ha condizionato in modo determinate l’evoluzione urbana è la necessità di garantire l’approvvigionamento idrico attraverso la raccolta e l’accumulo dell’acqua sorgiva e piovana con un sistema capillare e diffuso di canalizzazioni e cisterne.

Gli studi, che hanno interessato Matera nell’immediato dopoguerra, hanno enfatizzato la vita comunitaria che caratterizzava l’assetto sociale dei Sassi considerando il “vicinato” come modello da conservare e trasferire nei nuovi insediamenti che si andavano realizzando.

La scarsa considerazione assegnata dagli studi alla “qualità” dell’insediamento urbano nelle sue componenti relative alla sostenibilità e alla resilienza può essere addebitata alle particolari condizione abitative che caratterizzavano i Sassi nell’immediato dopoguerra riconducibili:

  • ai fenomeni di sovraffollamento delle abitazioni determinatasi storicamente nel periodo tra le due guerre che aveva visto Matera passare dai 20.163 abitanti del censimento del 1931 ai 30.390 del Censimento del 1951;
  • alle evidenti criticità che il sovraffollamento aveva creato, squilibrando il rapporto tra risorse, unità abitative e popolazione.

La mancanza di salubrità delle abitazioni dei Sassi non è stata considerata una condizione contingente ma una “vergogna” da sanare con il trasferimento in abitazioni “moderne”, senza cogliere le possibilità, recuperando la sapienza costruttiva accumulata nel corso dei secoli dagli abitanti, di traghettare con continuità l’insediamento dei Sassi nella “modernità”.

Solo nel 1993, con l’iscrizione nella lista del Patrimonio Mondiale dell’umanità, viene riconosciuto ai Sassi, dopo 40 anni di abbandono il loro valore di:

  • “eccezionale testimonianza … per le generazioni future per il modo di utilizzare la qualità dell’ambiente naturale per l’uso delle risorse del sole, della roccia e dell’acqua” (Criterio 3)
  • “esempio rilevante di un insieme architettonico e paesaggistico testimone di momenti significativi della storia dell’umanità” che hanno portato alla realizzazione di “sofisticate strutture urbane costruite con i materiali di scavo” (Criterio 4)
  • “rilevante esempio di insediamento umano tradizionale … che ha, dalle sue origini, mantenuto un armonioso rapporto con il suo ambiente naturale e un equilibrio tra intervento umano ed ecosistema per oltre nove millenni” (Criterio 5)

Le leggi speciali che hanno accompagnato l’evoluzione di Matera e dei Sassi da “Vergogna nazionale” a “Patrimonio dell’Umanità” e recentemente a “Capitale europea della cultura 2019” hanno svolto un ruolo rilevante.

Dalle prime leggi che hanno previsto lo sfollamento dei Sassi, il trasferimento della popolazione nei nuovi quartieri e il conferimento al demanio statale delle abitazioni abbandonate, con la legge 771/1986 si è arrivati ad avviare un vasto intervento di recupero che ha visto come protagonisti il Comune e i privati, attraverso l’istituto della subconcessione onerosa[2], i cui risultati sono evidenti.

Le particolari suggestioni che oggi la città di Matera offre possono essere ricondotte alla sensazione di “coerenza” complessiva dell’insediamento che gli interventi di recupero sono riusciti a realizzare nei singoli elementi costruttivi. Questo fa sì che i Sassi di Matera possano rappresentare, in modo esemplare, i valori presenti in molte città bacino del mediterraneo.

Matera, la comunità biofilica e sana.

L’antica città di Matera è un modello insediativo caratterizzato da un rapporto stretto con la natura del luogo.  Una città mediterranea, un “rifugio” scavato nella roccia, che ha i principi basilari di una comunità sana e felice. L’ambiente, a misura d’uomo, è fatto di luoghi sani, biofilici ed è costituito da invisibili connessioni che consentono flessibilità, efficienza e libertà.

Da ogni punto della città antica, dal Sasso Barisano, alla Civita, al Sasso Caveoso, ci si rapporta strettamente alla gravina[3]. Tale solco torrentizio non è che l’immagine della preistoria, appartenenza ancestrale alla madre terra, MATER- Matera.

Le caratteristiche ambientali costruiscono la città in una molteplicità di stratificazioni. C’è il colore cangiante della roccia, il suono dell’acqua della gravina, colonna sonora del giorno; c’è il senso di grande respiro che sale verso il cielo lungo i pendii.  Il sole e le ombre si seguono fino in fondo alle grotte scavate in obliquo, magiche e misteriose meridiane.

Una moltitudine di giardini pensili, di piante di vite si arrampicano come ragni alle pareti scavate a coprire i patii a mezzogiorno. Il paesaggio geologico diventa materiale costruttivo e attore protagonista della vita quotidiana. Tra le macchie e lungo il torrente non è raro scorgere una volpe con la fulgida coda come un pennello a dipingere il sentiero.

Le forme naturali sono nei sentieri curvi, disegnati per gli asini, un fiorire di segni botanici. Tutto si avvolge in se stesso come i canali di raccolta dell’acqua che con vortici veloci e le fenditure nette si riposano in ampie e placide cisterne, immobili ed eterne. Tutto è biomimesi, tutto appare come natura umanizzata. I percorsi e gli ambienti interni sono variabili alle stagioni e al tempo; sistemi aperti e chiusi s’intrecciano tra loro in una successione tra pubblico e privato in cui tutto è interconnesso. C’è una gerarchia complessa, come arterie e capillari nel corpo degli esseri viventi.

La luce naturale, simbolo di vita e colore, ha costruito questi ambienti, indicando la linea di scavo delle grotte fino a illuminarne le profondità.

Matera è spazio dell’anima, connessa con la storia umana e con la cultura materiale. Il senso che pervade la città è la verità e l’autenticità. Si esprime un grande senso di empatia, di forte connessione d’animo. E’ un equilibrio perfetto tra l’antico e il moderno in cui l’essere umano può sentirsi parte integrante della natura, sicuro rifugio. Un complesso sistema di stratificazioni che non esprime mai disordine ma continuo senso di scoperta e sicurezza. La contiguità nel vicinato esprime affezione umana, confronto in uno scambio di umanità. Un modello di comunità di grande spiritualità e bellezza che come diceva Stendhal “… è una promessa di felicità”.

Matera, Living Community?

La città di Matera è un luogo unico dove non è più possibile distinguere l’ambiente naturale e il luogo antropizzato perché il primo ha invaso il secondo e viceversa, un luogo in cui grotte naturali diventano casa e grotte scavate diventano naturali in un continuo rapporto osmotico che perdura anche oggi. Le abitazioni conservano quelle caratteristiche che le hanno connaturate per millenni, in un efficace dialogo con la contemporaneità che contribuisce alla sua stessa tutela.

L’impossibilità di raggiungere tutte le abitazioni con mezzi a motore regala inaspettati silenzi e una qualità della vita all’aperto ineguagliabile, oltre che un ambiente salubre e sicuro, in cui la mobilità lenta allontana i rischi prodotti dagli autoveicoli.

Da un punto di vista energetico potremmo immaginare che l’intero rione Sassi sia un’immensa massa con grande inerzia termica, se questo impone apporti energetici durante il periodo invernale, annulla l’utilizzo di metodi di raffrescamento estivi che sono preponderanti a queste latitudini.

L’essere Patrimonio Mondiale UNESCO, insieme con enormi vantaggi legati alla visibilità e al valore intrinseco del riconoscimento, impone degli obblighi, obblighi di rispetto del patrimonio stesso e del suo valore. Ne segue la necessità di utilizzare unicamente materiali della tradizione, privi quindi di agenti inquinanti. Pietra (tufo), legno, vetro e ferro li ritroviamo nelle facciate, nelle porte di accesso alle grotte, nelle piccole finestre e nelle ringhiere che disegnano il prospetto dei sassi, perché i Sassi questo sembrano, un unico indistinguibile prospetto nel quale colori e materiali in una danza silenziosa si uniscono agli spuntoni di roccia e all’azzurro del cielo per donarci immagini meravigliose.

Alicia Daniels Uhlig (International Living Future Institute)

Living Buildings e Living Communities: la sfida della rigenerazione, Matera, 6 febbraio 2018

L’evento organizzato dal Living Building Challenge Collaborative: Italy, ha portato il protocollo e la filosofia LBC nel cuore dell’estremo sud d’Italia. All’interno di Casa Cava – un’ex cava di tufo nei Sassi di Matera adibita a spazio per eventi culturali – si sono riuniti più di 120 architetti e ingegneri dalla Puglia e dalla Basilicata.

Alicia Daniels Uhlig, in collegamento da Seattle, ha illustrato il protocollo Living Community Challenge, con alcuni paralleli interessanti con l’esperienza di Matera. Nell’introduzione all’evento Michele Massaro, del Collaborative Italy, ha sottolineato come le buone pratiche di sviluppo urbano di Matera, siano un esempio ancora molto attuale di sostenibilità dell’ambiente costruito. Giuseppe Larato, pure del Collaborative, ha poi sintetizzato i più diffusi protocolli sulla sostenibilità degli edifici, aprendo la strada a una riflessione su LBC. Dal Politecnico di Bari, Francesco Fiorito ha evidenziato l’importanza di ridurre l’effetto isola di calore all’interno dei centri urbani; mentre Fabio Fatiguso ha analizzato i Sassi come caso studio di resilienza urbana per contrastare gli effetti del cambiamento climatico. Carlo Battisti, facilitatore del Collaborative italiano, ha infine fornito una panoramica sul protocollo LBC e sulla missione dell’International Living Future Institute.

I principi di LBC si ritrovano anche nelle attività di RESTORE (REthinking Sustainability TOwards a Regenerative Economy), un progetto di 4 anni finanziato dall’Unione Europea, che mira a creare le condizioni per una sostenibilità ristorativa dell’ambiente costruito, grazie ad una rete di più di 140 professionisti e ricercatori da 38 nazioni europee e internazionali.

Qui di seguito le presentazioni dell’evento:

[1] Con il nome “Sassi” a Matera s’intendono due grandi quartieri che costituiscono, insieme alla “Civita” e al “Piano”, il centro storico della città di Matera.

[2] Il concessionario di un bene demaniale può dare in uso a terzi, a titolo oneroso e dietro corrispettivo, locali facenti parte del demanio, sia mediante locazione che mediante subconcessione.

[3] La gravina è una tipica morfologia carsica della Murgia. Le gravine sono incisioni erosive profonde anche più di 100 metri, molto simili ai Canyon, scavate dalle acque meteoriche nella roccia calcarea. Le loro pareti, molto inclinate e in alcuni casi verticali, possono distare tra loro da poche decine a più di 200 metri.

This article, written in collaboration with Giuseppe Larato, Michele Massaro and Michele Scavetta, is the extended version of ‘Matera, Italy: the original Living Community’, featured on the last number of Trim Tab (Issue 33) of the International Living Future Institute, that you may read here.

Restorative buildings across Europe.

Join us for a series of talks between Berlin and London about restorative buildings.

Sustainability in buildings, as understood today, is an inadequate measure for architectural design, for it aims no higher than trying to make buildings ‘less bad’. Please join us in a series of events on week 16/2018 between Berlin and London to understand how we can bring restorative principles to buildings across Europe. Here is the program, enjoy 🙂

Greenbuild Europe Reception
April 16, 2018
6-7:30 PM
Humboldt-Box
Schloßpl. 5, 10178 Berlin, Germany

The International Living Future Institute would like to invite you to join a reception at the inaugural Greenbuild Europe Conference for a special announcement.
This exciting event and presentation will feature Amanda Sturgeon, CEO and author of Creating Biophilic Buildings, talking about the future of green buildings and regenerative design.
The event is free, but registration is required. Food and drink will be provided.
with Amanda Sturgeon (ILFI, CEO) and Carlo Battisti.

Bringing Restorative and Living Buildings to Europe. The COST Action RESTORE.
April 18, 2018
10-11 AM
Greenbuild Europe, Radisson Blu Hotel
Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 3, 10178 Berlin, Germany

The COST Action CA16114 ‘REthinking Sustainability TOwards a Regenerative Economy’ (RESTORE) will affect a paradigm shift towards restorative sustainability for new and existing buildings, promoting forward thinking and multidisciplinary knowledge, leading to solutions that celebrate the richness of design creativity while enhancing users’ experience, health and wellbeing inside and outside buildings, in harmony with urban ecosystems, reconnecting users to nature.
– with Carlo Battisti, Martin Brown (Fairsnape) and Amanda Sturgeon (ILFI, CEO).

Life Cycle Assessment as a tool for design.
April 18, 2018
10-11 AM
Greenbuild Europe, Radisson Blu Hotel
Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 3, 10178 Berlin, Germany

This session will focus on tools available to practitioners to assess and lower emissions of their projects, through environmental-oriented material and construction choices. New information will include an inventory of available data in Europe, an overview of LCA tools, a proposed simplification and standardisation of uncertainty in LCA and a hands-on case study.
– with Catherine De Wolf (EPFL), Giulia Peretti (WSGT), Lisanne Havinga (TU Eindhoven) and Emanuele Naboni (KADK).

Healthy habitats for humans.
April 20, 2018
8:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Interface London, 1 Northburgh Street, London EC1V 0AL, United Kingdom

“Biophilic design is a design philosophy, and has the potential to intentionally reconnect people and nature through buildings. It goes beyond adding plants or a water feature and focuses on connecting to the particular ecology of a place, to its culture and climate to create buildings that are full of life.”
– with Amanda Sturgeon, author of Creating Biophilic Buildings, CEO, International Living Future Institute.
Price £ 53,59. Tickets here.

Living Communities a Matera.

Living Buildings & Living Communities: la sfida della rigenerazione.

Quando: martedì 6 febbraio 2018, ore 15:30-19:00
Dove: Casa Cava
Indirizzo: Via S. Pietro Barisano, Matera
L’evento è gratuito, previa registrazione qui. Posti limitati.

Living Building Challenge

Il Living Building Challenge (LBC) è il più rigoroso standard prestazionale dell’ambiente costruito. Prevede la progettazione e realizzazione di edifici funzionanti in modo pulito, bello ed efficiente così come lo richiede un’architettura ispirata alla natura. Questi sono i “Petali” LBC (le categorie prestazionali di sostenibilità Living Building Challenge): PLACE (Luogo), WATER (Acqua), ENERGY (Energia), HEALTH & HAPPINESS (Salute e felicità), MATERIALS (Materiali), EQUITY (Equità), BEAUTY (Bellezza).

Maggiori informazioni: http://living-future.org/lbc

Obiettivi

I partecipanti acquisiranno una conoscenza di base del Living Building Challenge – una filosofia, uno strumento di patrocinio ambientale e un programma di certificazione che affrontano lo sviluppo sostenibile a tutti i livelli. Per essere certificati secondo LBC, i progetti devono soddisfare una serie di requisiti prestazionali ambiziosi misurati per un minimo di 12 mesi di occupazione continua.

Come possiamo estendere questi concetti a livello di comunità? Con la guida di Alicia Daniels Uhlig dell’International Living Future Institute di Seattle (WA, USA) scopriremo il Living Community Challenge, uno strumento di pianificazione urbana, progettazione e costruzione per creare una relazione simbiotica tra le persone e tutti gli aspetti dell’ambiente costruito.

Con la partecipazione di:

Living Building Challenge Collaborative: Italy, un gruppo di professionisti volontari impegnati per la sostenibilità, la formazione e l’attuazione del Living Building Challenge, lo standard di sostenibilità dell’ambiente costruito più avanzato al mondo.
Naturalia-BAU, l’azienda altoatesina che da 25 anni propone prodotti e sistemi naturali di alta qualità per una casa sana e rappresenta in Italia un importante punto di riferimento del settore bio-edile.
DICATECh, il Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, del Territorio, Edile e di Chimica del Politecnico di Bari.

Programma

Alicia Daniels Uhlig è un architetto e appassionato sostenitore della bioedilizia, con 20 anni di esperienza nella progettazione sostenibile. Alicia è direttore per l’International Living Future Institute del protocollo Living Community Challenge e responsabile per le policies, è impegnata ad accelerare la creazione di comunità vivaci, sane e sostenibili. Prima di unirsi a ILFI, ha praticato la libera professione di architetto a Seattle (Washington, USA) con GGLO, in California con Van der Ryn Architects e nelle Isole Vergini americane. Il focus di Alicia sulla sostenibilità l’ha portata anche a lavorare su progetti di architettura locale in Italia (segue).

Informazioni e registrazione

Dove: Casa Cava, via San Pietro Barisano 47, Matera
Parcheggi: consigliato Via Roma/Piazza Matteotti.  Tuteliamo l’ambiente, prediligiamo mezzi pubblici o mezzi in condivisione.
Informazioni:  +39 340 8003909
Registrazione: Partecipazione gratuita, posti limitati. Iscrizione tramite Eventbrite qui.
Scadenza per la registrazione: lunedì 05.02.2018.
Crediti formativi professionali: verranno riconosciuti 3 CFP per gli ingegneri, in accordo con l’Ordine degli Ingegneri della Provincia di Matera.

Vi aspettiamo 🙂

Casa Cava, Matera

Come join us for LF17 :-)

Living Future unConference 2017
THE LEADING EVENT FOR REGENERATIVE DESIGN

Living Future unConference is an annual event that attracts disruptive design leaders. Join a cross-industry collaborative network that is creating a healthy built environment.


Celebrate Genius and Courage in all of its forms during the 11th Annual Living Future unConference, May 17-19 in Seattle, WA. Join us for unconventional sessions + dynamic speakers, including Van Jones, Naomi Klein, and Kirsti Luke.  Living Future brings hundreds of thought-leaders to the table to create a healthy and just future for all. #ChallengetheNorm and uncover your role to make this future a reality. Register here 🙂

Living Future unConference is the forum for leading minds in the green building movement to make strides toward a healthy future for all. This year, we will focus on the layers of Genius and Courage during unconventional sessions and dynamic speaking engagements with top-notch keynotes. We’ll open the unConference with Van Jones, a civil rights leader, former Obama White House advisor and CNN political correspondent. Celebrate 11 years of innovation and partake in the out-of-the-ordinary experience that is the essence of the unConference.

Unforgettable keynotes

Van Jones is a civil rights leader, former Obama White House advisor, and CNN political correspondent. He is the Founder and President of Dream Corps — an incubator, platform and home for world-changing initiatives that empower the most vulnerable in our society. The Dream Corps three programs,#cut50, #YesWeCode, and Green For All, work to close prison doors and open doors of opportunity. A Yale-educated attorney, Van has written two New York Times bestsellers: The Green Collar Economy, the definitive book on green jobs, and Rebuild the Dream, a roadmap for progressives.

Naomi Klein is an award-winning journalist, syndicated columnist and author of the international bestsellers, No Logo, The Shock Doctrine, and most recently This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs the Climate (2014) which is being translated into over 25 languages.  This Changes Everything, the documentary inspired by the book and narrated by Naomi premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival. In 2017 she joined The Intercept as Senior Correspondent. Recent articles have also appeared in The Guardian, The Nation, The New York Times, the New Yorker, Le Monde, The London Review of Books.

Kirsti Luke is Chief Executive of Tūhoe Te Uru Taumatua, Ngāi Tūhoe’s Tribal Authority. She holds a Bachelor of Law (LLB), is extremely knowledgeable about the tribe’s treaty claims, and was involved in the establishment of Te Uru Taumatua. Her goal is to build the organization and the tribe’s economy and improve descendants’ quality of life. Her role includes recruiting management staff, building relationships with stakeholders and government agencies, developing policies to improve or coordinate options for housing, health and employment for Tūhoe and providing business recommendations to build up the tribe’s economy.

The full program

Browse the full LF17 program here.


Follow LF17 on social media

Twitter
@Living_Future
@LivingBuilding

Facebook
Facebook.com/livingfutureinstitute
Facebook.com/livingbuildingchallenge

LinkedIn
https://www.linkedin.com/company/international-living-future-institute

Instagram
@Living_Future

Follow the Conversation
#LF17
#ChallengetheNorm
#OurLivingFuture

The International Living Building Institute
The International Living Future Institute is an environmental NGO committed to catalyzing the transformation toward communities that are socially just, culturally rich and ecologically restorative. Composed of leading green building experts and thought-leaders, the Institute is premised on the belief that providing a compelling vision for the future is a fundamental requirement for reconciling humanity’s relationship with the natural world.
https://living-future.org/